Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders

School of Adult & Graduate Studies

Earn your degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Montreat College’s Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders is designed for students with a desire to become registered Speech Language Pathologist Assistants, or to pursue further education, after graduation. Students will be equipped with the skills to understand the complexities of and science behind how we communicate.

Communication Sciences and Disorders Degree Highlights

  • Build your foundational understanding and skills in identifying the science behind both the diagnosis of speech-language disorders and the methods used to treat them from experienced faculty.
  • Learn how language develops normally and how to identify abnormal development with relevance to the communications field.
  • Gain a broad knowledge base in communication disorders that can give you the training and experience needed for the next phase of higher learning.
  • Enjoy the benefits of online learning. Study when it is convenient in the comfort of your personal environment, while learning from supportive professors who care about your success.

For over 25 years, Montreat College’s School of Adult and Graduate Studies has been helping adult students acquire essential skills, complete their degrees, and take their career to the next level. Montreat offers undergraduate, graduate, and certificate programs in a classroom or online.

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Frequently Asked Questions

When are the start dates for the Communication Sciences and Disorders degree program?

There are six start dates for new students every year, in January, February, May, June, August, and October​. Please see the following for specific enrollment and start dates.

How long does it take to complete the Communication Sciences and Disorders degree program?

A Bachelor’s Degree is 120 credit hours and can take one to four years to complete depending upon the amount of credits you transfer in.

How much does the Communication Sciences and Disorders degree program cost?

The cost is $425 per credit hour plus a $150 student fee per semester. In addition, there are multiple college and government financial aid programs available to help mitigate the cost of your education. You can learn more about your financial aid options.

What are the length of online courses?

Starting Fall 2021, all courses will be eight-week sessions. There are 2 sessions in a semester. To be considered a full-time undergraduate student, a student must take 12 credit hours per semester. For the 12 credit hours, the student must take 2 courses (6 credit hours) the first eight-week session and 2 courses (6 credit hours) the second eight-week session. Semesters in this program are Spring, Summer, and Fall.

What jobs can you pursue with a Communication Sciences and Disorders degree?
  • Audiologists
  • Speech Language Educator
  • Special Education Instructor
  • Speech Therapist
  • Children’s Hearing Specialist
  • Registered Speech Language Pathology Assistants (SPLA)
  • Audiology Assistants
What is the job market like for people with Communication Sciences and Disorders degree?

The regional outlook is strong, with 16.31% job growth expected over the next 10 years, compared to 11.7% job growth, nationally. The market demand for graduates of Communication Sciences and Disorders/SLPA degrees is evident.

How much money do Communication Sciences and Disorders professionals typically make?

The average regional salary of graduates from this type of program is $51,698 and nationally $51,061.

What graduate programs this degree prepare me to apply for?

A Masters in or Doctor of Speech Language Pathology, or a Master’s or Doctor in Audiology.

What are the admissions requirements?

Applicants must submit the following for admissions consideration:

  • Montreat College Application for Admission
  • Official, final transcripts of all college courses taken*
  • Overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale or higher in all previous college work attempted.
  • Official, final high school transcript or its equivalent (if transferring less than 12 semester credits of college credit)*
  • American Council on Education (ACE) verification demonstrating any eligible CLEP and DSST examinations, and non-collegiate military training.

*All final transcripts must include graduation information

What are the degree requirements?

Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders students must meet graduation requirements and are found in the AGS Academic Catalog.

Courses

BCSD2000 Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders

This course investigates application of biology, physics, anatomy, physiology, and cognitive psychology to processes of speech, language, and hearing. Students will investigate the nature of disruptions to normal communication and scientific principles of prevention, diagnosis, and plan remediation.

BCSD2110 Ethics and Standards for SLPAs

This course provides an overview of the theory, practice, and philosophy of speech-language pathology assisting. Topics include legal and ethical issues, scope of practice, multiculturalism, and diversity. Upon completion, students will be able to describe characteristics of the profession and identify components of safe and ethical practice within the work of speech language pathology.

BCSD2300, 2301 Acquired Disorders

This course provides an introduction to clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on acquired conditions commonly treated in speech-language pathology. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately administer screening tests and therapeutic protocols and identify characteristics of acquired speech, language, and hearing disorders.

BCSD2050 Introduction to Phonetics

This course introduces the International Phonetic Alphabet and the categories of speech sounds, including voice, place, and manner of production. Emphasis is placed on the accurate transcription of normal and abnormal speech samples using the IPA and on the production of effective natural speech. Upon completion, students should be able to transcribe and categorize speech sounds and produce natural speech using appropriate breathing, articulation, and pronunciation.

BCSD3040 Assistive Technology

This course introduces the preparation, use, and maintenance of selected communication equipment in the treatment of respective disorders. Emphasis is placed on the collaborative use of assistive equipment for speech, language, and hearing disorders. Upon completion, students will be able to instruct the patient and caregiver in the use and maintenance of assistive communication equipment.

BCSD3050 Normal Communication Development

This course introduces normal verbal and non-verbal communications across the life span, including appropriate social interaction with diverse populations. Topics include normal speech, language, and hearing in a multicultural society and an introduction to screening for normality and abnormality. Upon completion, students will be able to identify normal speech, language, and hearing patterns.

BCSD2200, 2201 Developmental Disorders

This course covers screening for speech, language, and hearing disorders; use of observational checklists; and administration of therapeutic protocols. Emphasis is placed on conditions commonly treated in speech-language pathology. Upon completion, students should be able to accurately administer screening tests and therapeutic protocols and identify characteristics of developmental speech, language, and hearing disorders.

BCSD2150, 2155 Treatment Intervention

This course introduces students to a multitude of intervention techniques used to treat individuals of all ages with communication disorders in a variety of clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on understanding the therapeutic process and the effectiveness of evidence-based practices currently being used in the field of speech and language across the lifespan. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate competencies in the therapeutic process.

BCSD3100 Anatomical and Physiological Bases of Speech

This course introduces the basic pathophysiology of the orofacial and thoracic structures of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the most treated speech, language, and hearing disorders. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and describe basic pathophysiology related to the production of speech and hearing.

BCSD3150 Introduction to Audiology

This course explores the science of hearing and disorders related to audiology. A foundational understanding of the evaluation, conservation, and aural rehabilitation of individuals with hearing disorders is established.

BCSD4000, 4001 Clinical Phonetics

This course focuses on sounds and symbols of American English, foreign accents, and dialects using broad and narrow transcription methods. Presents speech production, distinctive features, and basics of phonology.

BCSD4005 Clinical Methods and Treatment of Comm. Disorders (Capstone)

This course allows students to further develop within the clinical application of approaches for identifying, assessing, and treating individuals with communication disorders. Prerequisite BCSD 2100

BCSD4100 BCSD/SLP Fieldwork

This course provides supervised fieldwork experience in speech-language pathology assisting in a minimum of two diverse sites. Emphasis is placed on the use of written protocols in providing patient care. Upon completion, students should be able to integrate ethical concepts into safe and effective clinical practice.

PSYC 3500 Developmental Psychology

An overview of the human life span from conception through end of life. Continuity of development as well as critical periods faced by the maturing human are emphasized using contemporary theories and research as foundation materials. Biological, physical, cognitive, emotional, sociocultural and spiritual changes across the life span are discussed. Pre­Requisite: PSYC1100 Psychology Applied to Modern Life

PSYC3200 Introduction to Neuroscience

This course introduces the study of the molecular, cellular, behavioral, and computational mechanisms of the brain. The structure and function of the nervous system and brain, as well as neuroplasticity are explored. Prerequisite: Psychology Applied to Modern Life

BIOL 2211, 2201 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This course is an introduction to basic concepts of biology and the in-depth anatomy and physiology of the skeletal and muscular systems with additional overviews of human respiratory, cardiovascular and nervous system anatomy and physiology for health sciences students. The laboratory portion emphasizes the scientific method, involving observation, experimentation, and data analysis.