A Christ-centered institution.


Academics

May Term

May Term is a three-week intensive program that allows for concentrated study with Montreat faculty at a reduced tuition rate. It’s perfect for working ahead, catching up, or simply enjoying in-depth that learning focuses on one or two topics.

 

Time for focused study.

May Term is not just for Montreat College students. We welcome students from other schools who also want to accelerate their programs between spring and summer terms. Community members may also have an interest in May Term. Classes such as Christian Worldview, Christian Doctrine, and Elementary Spanish offer great opportunities for personal development.

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Application dates

Registration open: March 3

Registration deadline: May 13

Financial aid deadline: April 22

Tuition due: May 2

Course dates

May 14–June 4

Special session and online course dates vary and are listed under course offerings below.

Registration address

Submit your completed registration form to our Registrar’s Office, at the following address.

Montreat College
Office of Records and Registration
310 Gaither Circle
PO Box 1267
Montreat, NC 28757

828.669.8012, ext., 3734
Fax: 828.669.2141


request info

 

Course Offerings

BB 101: Survey of the Old Testament  (3) — T.Gibson

May 14–June 4
8:30 a.m.–11:20 p.m.

A study of Hebrew history, faith and literature. Emphasis is given to the origins described in Genesis, the religious significance of the Exodus, the Mosaic Covenant and the major teachings of the prophets. Examination is made of the relationship of God and man and the unfolding plan of redemption. 


 

BL 102: Survey of Biological Principles II (4) — B. Joyce

May 14–June 4
8:30–11:20 a.m.

General introductory study stressing principles common to all living organisms: their structure, function, basic chemical and physical properties, inheritance, evolution, and ecology.


BL 102L: Survey of Biological Principles II Lab — B. Joyce

May 14–June 4
11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

General introductory study stressing principles common to all living organisms: their structure, function, basic chemical and physical properties, inheritance, evolution, and ecology.


BS 204: Microeconomics (3) SPECIAL SESSION — R. Harshbarger

May 14–June 4
9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.

A study of modern explanations of national income and employment. The course will give special emphasis to the American economy, its production, inter-relationships of households, business, and government, nature and function of money, monetary and fiscal policy, and public finance. Pre- or Co-requisite: BS 101.


 

BS 214: Quantitative Methods (3) SPECIAL SESSION — R. Harshbarger

May 14–June 16
1–3:50 p.m.

Models for decision-making for marketing, finance, accounting, production and operations management, parametric and nonparametric statistics. An introduction to simple regression models, constrained and unconstrained optimization, and other techniques. Pre-requisite: MT 114.


 

BS 309: Business Ethics (3) ONLINE — M. Wells

June 8–July 12

This course includes an analysis of business policies and practices with respect to their social and moral impact. It raises basic questions on moral reasoning and the morality of economic systems, both nationally and internationally. It also examines the impact of governmental regulations on corporate behavior, and the ethical relationships between the corporation and the public. Pre-requisite: BS 101. 


BS 437:Marketing Management (3) — S. Owolabi

May 14–June 4

8:30 a.m.–11:20 p.m.

This course gives students an understanding of real world personal finance issues. Topics covered include budgeting, credit and money management, basic investment options, insurance, goal and retirement planning using time value of money, real estate loans and procedures, and taxes. Students will complete this course with a set of practical tools to help them make informed personal finance decisions.


 

BS 480: Personal Finance (3) SPECIAL TOPIC— S. Dukas

May 14–June 4

1–3:50 p.m.

A study of modern explanations of national income and employment. The course will give special emphasis to the American economy, its production, inter-relationships of households, business, and government, nature and function of money, monetary and fiscal policy, and public finance. Pre- or Co-requisite: BS 101.


 

CM 480: Advanced Film Production (3) SPECIAL SESSION – J. Shores and J. Menick

May 14–May 23 (All day)

Students will work with Jon Menick of Story Point Media, a veteran film actor and director of 30 years.  The goal is to create a quality 10-minute, narrative film short.  The film will be original and written by Jim Shores specifically for the course.  Students will be involved in pre-production planning during the latter half of the spring semester, securing locations and lining up talent. Actual filming and editing will take place May 14-23. Students will serve as film crew, camera talent, and editors. Students should be completely available during this time – all day and into the evenings.   


CS 102: Personal Productivity with Information Systems Technology (3) ONLINE — J. Teo

May 11–July 12

A course enabling students to improve their skills as knowledgeable workers with an emphasis on personal productivity concepts through using functions and features in computer software such as word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation graphics and Web authoring. 


CS 204: Fundamentals of Information Systems (3) ONLINE — J. Teo

May 11–July 12

Providing an introduction to systems and development concepts, information technology, and application software, this course explains how information is used in organizations and how information technology enables improvement in quality, timeliness, and competitive advantage in organizations. Topics include systems concepts, system components and relationships, cost/value and quality of information, competitive advantage and information, specification, design and reengineering of information systems, application versus system software, and package software solutions. Pre-requisite: CS 102 or permission of professor 


 

EN 102: English Composition II (3) — TBA

May 14–June 14

8:30–11:20 a.m.

Research techniques and the writing of a research paper are included, in addition to continued practice in expository writing.  Pre-requisite: EN 101 with a minimum grade of “C-.”


 

EN 202: Survey of English Literature II (3) ONLINE — K. McMurtry

June 8–July 12

A survey of English literature from the Romantic period to the present. Pre-requisites: EN 101–102


 

EN 480: Nature in the Poetry, Fiction, & Non-fiction of C.S. Lewis (3) SPECIAL SESSION — D. King

May 24–June 2

Cost: Tuition + $2,520 Oxford Trip

This course is a study of C. S. Lewis’ important imaginative and analytical works reflecting his Christian worldview.  As one of the twentieth century’s most prolific and influential Christian writers, Lewis’ work is a treasure trove for those seeking to learn how to think deeply and Christianly. His clear, lucid writing is especially helpful when he addresses complex issues, and his use of illustrations by way of analogy frequently sheds light on previously dark and thorny issues.  Students will read and discuss his popular works focusing on his Christian world view, write a series of short essays in which they engage Lewis’ ideas and evaluate their merits, and write a final analytical essay. 


EN 480: The Life and Works of C.S. Lewis (3) SPECIAL TOPICS — ONLINE — D. King

June –July 12

This course will explore the life of C. S. Lewis by focusing on his letters, diaries, poems, and public writings.  As one of the most outspoken and prolific writers of the century, he remains a fascinating figure:  Oxford and Cambridge scholar, Christian apologist, literary critic, poet, children’s writer, and fiction writer. Books to be covered include Surprised by Joy, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, The Problem of Pain, and A Grief Observed


 

Internship Practicums, CBA  (1-6) SPECIAL SESSION — Various Faculty

May 14–20

Internships, Practicums, Online Courses and Courses by Arrangement are available for various academic programs through the summer term.  Instructor permission is required for each course, and must be obtained prior to registration.  


IS 310: Pre-Internship (1) — T. Oxenreider

May 14–20
8:30–11:20 a.m. 

Special offering of Pre-Internship during the 2013 May Term so that preparations can be made to schedule a summer or fall internship through the supervising academic advisor.  


IS 461: Philosophy of Faith and Learning (2) — T. Gibson

May 14– 28
1:00 – 3:50 p.m.

A course designed to help students define their personal Christian philosophy of life by integrating faith and learning. Students are challenged to explore their Christian calling and to consider ways in which they can exert Christian influence in the world today. Pre-requisite: Senior standing or permission of professor.


MT 114: Elementary Probability and Statistics (3) — TBA

May 14–June 4
8:30–11:20 a.m.

A non-calculus course that introduces elementary concepts in descriptive statistics, probability, sampling distributions, linear regression, correlation, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Applications from a variety of disciplines including social sciences and business. Analyses of observed data are performed manually, by calculator, and by computer.


MT 121: College Algebra (3) — TBA 

May 14 –June 4
8:30–11:20 p.m.

A course that explores fundamental concepts of algebra including properties of real numbers, equations and inequalities, polynomial and other algebraic functions and their graphs.  Additional topics may include solving systems of equations and inequalities, matrices and determinants, conic sections, etc.  Pre-requisite:  Grade of B or above in high school algebra II or equivalent.


OE 180: Discovery Wilderness Expedition (4) SPECIAL SESSION — A. Bobilya

May 11–31

Cost: Tuition + $1,000 course fee.

A 21-day wilderness expedition that may include backpacking, rock climbing, whitewater canoeing, camping, route finding, a solo experience and a personal challenge eventStudents focus on development in: stewardship, discipleship, community and leadership. This is a physically challenging course; participants must be in at least average physical condition to participate. This course is open to the public and does not require prior experience.  OE 180 fulfills one Gen Ed PE class for all Montreat students.


OE 182: Wilderness Journey Practicum: Sea Kayaking (2) SPECIAL SESSION — J. Rogers

May 12–18

Cost: Tuition + $500 course fee.

Course focused on helping the student learn to travel safely and efficiently by kayak of the type designated as a sea kayak with bulkheads or flotation. There is more emphasis on self-rescue and assisted-rescue techniques and the stability strokes are introduced. Also, Rules of the Navigable Road, tides and currents, wind and waves, emergency equipment, use of VHF radios and weather radios, understanding charts and basic use of a compass are covered in more depth. Graduates should be capable of paddling up to half mile off shore with mild conditions such as light and variable winds, up to one foot of wind chop, and current speeds up to 1 knot.


SM 337: Seminar in Sports Marketing (3) ONLINE — D. Knapp

June 8–July 12 

A course designed to examine the unique requirements of planning, designing, developing sponsorship packages, obtaining sponsors, and promoting a sport product or event. Over the course of the semester, students will develop and present a plan for production of a sport event. Pre-requisites: BS 230 and SM 210.


 

SP 101: Beginning Spanish (3) SPECIAL SESSION — H. Hernandez

May 16–June 20 

MW 9 a.m.–12 p.m.

This course will begin developing the four communicative Spanish language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Emphasis will be placed on fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Contact with Hispanic cultures will be incorporated.  


 

SP 102: Beginning Spanish II (3) SPECIAL SESSION — H. Hernandez

June 23–July 28 

MW 9 a.m.–12 p.m.

This course will begin developing the four communicative Spanish language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Emphasis will be placed on fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation. Contact with Hispanic cultures will be incorporated.  


SP 201: Intermediate Spanish (3) SPECIAL SESSION — H. Hernandez

May 16–June 20 

MW 1–4 p.m.

This course involves intensive work developing Spanish communicative skills (Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing).  Students will develop their appreciation for the diversities of the Hispanic cultures and civilization. Emphasis will be placed on grammar, vocabulary, composition and conversation. Pre-requisite: SP 102 or placement test.


 

SP 202: Intermediate Spanish II (3) SPECIAL SESSION — H. Hernandez

June 23–July 28 

MW 1–4 p.m.

This course involves intensive work developing Spanish communicative skills (Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing).  Students will develop their appreciation for the diversities of the Hispanic cultures and civilization. Emphasis will be placed on grammar, vocabulary, composition and conversation. Pre-requisite: SP 102 or placement test.


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